DO Dra

2022-05-14T09:37:10+00:0012 May 2022|News, Variable Star|

AAVSO “Alert Notice 753: Monitoring requested for seven intermediate polars” – DO Dra (also known as YY Dra) is on the list, it’s circumpolar and easy from here.

“Photometry (V, CV) of the targets in the table below is requested. DSLR green and visual observations are welcome to supplement the light curves. The cadence requested is every other night, as weather permits, and “about one hour of coverage per night (enough to catch a few spin cycles of the white dwarf). If a source is found to be in a low state, then we request longer coverage and nightly cadence. SNR>>10 is ideal…”

Photometry (V, CV) of the targets in the table below is requested. DSLR green and visual observations are welcome to supplement the light curves. The cadence requested is every other night, as weather permits, and “about one hour of coverage per night (enough to catch a few spin cycles of the white dwarf). If a source is found to be in a low state, then we request longer coverage and nightly cadence. SNR>>10 is ideal…”

Covington adds: “These systems show periodic variability on the spin period of the WD, usually on order of ~10 minutes. So, shorter exposure times are needed so the spin variability isn’t washed out. Previous AAVSO observations of these sources have had exposure times <60s, which is ideal. Also, accurate time tagging of the observations is required, so we can measure periodicities!”

Thought I’d give it a go for 1 hour. Uploaded to AAVSO and BAA databases.

Object IDDO Dra
Typical/high state mag. 15.0 – 15.5 V
Range: 10.0 – 17.2 V
Details23:00 – 23:59 UT
Telescope250mm f4.8 Newtonian
CameraAtik 460ex @-10°C
FiltersV photometric
Exposure(s)70 x 60s
dfb
CaptureNINA
ProcessingASTAP

An Intermediate Polar (also called a DQ Herculis Star) is a type of cataclysmic variable binary star system with a white dwarf and a cool main-sequence secondary star. In most cataclysmic variables, matter from the companion star is gravitationally stripped by the compact star and forms an accretion disk around it. In intermediate polar systems, the same general scenario applies except that the inner disk is disrupted by the magnetic field of the white dwarf.

The name “intermediate polar” is derived from the strength of the white dwarf’s magnetic field, which is between that of non-magnetic cataclysmic variable systems and strongly magnetic systems. Non-magnetic systems exhibit full accretion disks, while strongly magnetic systems (called polars or AM Herculis systems) exhibit only accretion streams which directly impact the white dwarf’s magnetosphere.

Wikipedia

AR2993 AR2994

2022-04-25T17:00:46+00:0019 April 2022|News, Sun|

Request for observations as these groups develop from the BAA. Managed 8 days in a row!

Object IDSun AR2993, AR2994
Details2022-04-18 – 2022-04-25
Telescope250mm f4.8 Newtonian
Black polymer filter + R
CameraZWO ASI290MC
Exposure(s)90 – 120s ser video
40% / 20% / 25% frames
CaptureFireCapture
ProcessingAS3!, Registax, Photoshop

GMN meteor plot 2022-03-27 22:36:11.685049

2022-03-28T18:29:38+00:0028 March 2022|Meteorcam, Meteors, News|

A bright meteor, captured by my camera UK006E, also seen and matched by 8 other stations.

Mag. -2.90
Duration 1.20s
V avg 42.97 km/s
Height beg/end: 111 km / 86 km
Sporadic

HOYS and 2MASS 21383981+5708470

2022-04-27T09:49:10+00:0025 March 2022|HOYS, News|

I’ve been continuing to gather HOYS data as normal and particularly focusing on this star as it’s a bit too low for most people in the evening, but high enough even when below the Pole Star from here in Edinburgh. A lot of the last few weeks data points are mine. Going back to the CCD camera and using real V and R photometric filters has increased accuracy to 0.02 – 0.04 as well.

The star has just undergone a new outburst and is starting to decline again.

The HOYS project reached another recent milestone of 60,00 images in the database. Unfortunately this means the database is now very slow to extract data for lightcurves for. Needs some funding for a developer to work on the database indexing.

M100 (NGC 4321

2022-03-21T10:03:11+00:0021 March 2022|Galaxy, M91+, News|

A grand design spiral galaxy in Coma Berenices, 55 million light years away and part of the Virgo cluster.
V and R filters used

Object IDM100, NGC 4321
Coma Berenices
7.4′ x 6.3′
Mag. 9.5
Details2022-03-20
Telescope240mm f4.8 Newtonian
R, V filters
CameraAtik 460EX @-10 °C
Exposure(s)20 x 180s V
20 x 180s R
d,f,b
CaptureNINA
ProcessingAPP, Photoshop

2MASS J17554042+6551277 first star imaged by JWST

2022-03-17T17:19:31+00:0017 March 2022|News, Other|

The first star imaged by JWST after alignment and focusing complete

Object ID2MASS J17554042+6551277
Details2022-03-16 23:30 – 22:43 UT
Telescope240mm f4.8 Newtonian
R filter
CameraAtik 460EX @-10 °C
Exposure(s)5 x 180s
d,f,b
CaptureNINA
ProcessingAPP, Photoshop

And here’s the actual image
Credits: NASA/STScI

Type Ia supernova 2022hrs in NGC 4647

2022-04-19T13:12:14+00:0019 April 2022|News, Supernova|

2022hrs (= ATLAS22mip), TNS discovered 2022/04/16.619 by Koichi Itagaki
Found in NGC 4647 at R.A. = 12h43m34s.350, Decl. = +11°34’36”.00
Located 30″.0 east and 18″.7 south of the center of NGC 4647
Galaxy is about mag. 12.5, supernova about mag. 14.1 R  using photometry with ASTAP.

Object IDSupernova 2022hrs
Details2022-04-18 23:20 UT
Telescope250mm f4.8 Newtonian
R filter
CameraAtik 460EX @-10 °C
Exposure(s)3 x 180s
d,f,b
CaptureNINA
ProcessingPhotoshop, ASTAP

Type II supernova 2022ewj in NGC 3367

2022-03-23T09:00:17+00:0023 March 2022|News, Supernova|

2022ewj (= ATLAS22jhw), TNS discovered 2022/03/19.544 by Koichi Itagaki
Found in NGC 3367 at R.A. = 10h46m34s.630, Decl. = +13°45’16”.98
Galaxy is about mag. 12, supernova about mag. 16.3 R  using photometry with ASTAP.

Object IDSupernova 2021ewj
Details2022-03-22 22:31 – 22:42 UT
Hazy skies
Telescope250mm f4.8 Newtonian
R filter
CameraAtik 460EX @-10 °C
Exposure(s)5 x 180s
d,f,b
CaptureNINA
ProcessingAPP, Photoshop, ASTAP

SN 2021agpf in NGC 5732

2022-03-17T16:48:06+00:0017 March 2022|News, Supernova|

2021agpf (= ATLAS21bnoc), TNS discovered 2021/12/26.624 by ATLAS
Found in NGC 5732 at R.A. = 14h40m37s.708, Decl. = +38°37’56”.31
Galaxy is about mag. 14, supernova about mag. 17.3 using photometry with ASTAP.

Object IDSupernova 2021agpf
Details2022-03-16 22:19 – 22:47 UT
Strong moonlight
Telescope240mm f4.8 Newtonian
R filter
CameraAtik 460EX @-10 °C
Exposure(s)10 x 180s
d,f,b
CaptureNINA
ProcessingAPP, Photoshop, ASTAP

New meteor camera first detections

2022-03-16T16:16:53+00:0014 March 2022|Meteorcam, Meteors, News|

As part of the Global Meteor Network I have added a new camera on the edge of Edinburgh, built following the GMN wiki instructions. Scotland doesn’t seem to have many and definitely needs more.

Still in the early config stages but this is the first detection saved as an animated GIF. I don’t plan on posting these here all the time but these are the first!

My azimuth seems to be about 120° which is what I was aiming for.

2022-03-13 02:22:58 UT
2022-03-15 02:06:15 UT

My IstraStream is here.

And from the second night, much better:

Detected meteors 2022-03-15 UK006E

This is my detection coverage.
Calibrated azimuth: 120.5°, altitude 49.5°

19P/Borrelly

2022-03-01T18:03:32+00:0028 February 2022|Comets, News|

Currently the brightest comet around at about mag. 9. Photometry with ASTAP gives me a V magnitude of 9.7. Animation shows it heading away from the Sun now, after perihelion (1 Feb 2022), tail first.

Object IDComet 19P Borrelly
Details2022-02-26 21:02:22 – 21:42:46
Telescope250mm f4.8 Newtonian
V filter
CameraAtik 460EX @-10°C
Exposure(s)20 x 120s
darks, flats, bias
CaptureNINA
ProcessingASTAP, Photoshop
19P Borrelly Animation

145 Adeona asteroid light curve

2022-03-03T11:44:23+00:003 March 2022|Asteroid, News|

Third submission to GOSA project. This was marked as a “Important target” with just 25% completed.

Object ID145 Adeona
Details2022-03-01 20:06:31 to 2022-03-01 22:55:22
Telescope250mm f4.8 Newtonian
V filter
CameraAtik 460EX @-10°C
Exposure(s)56 x 180s
darks, flats, bias
CaptureNINA
ProcessingGOSA

22 Kalliope asteroid light curve

2022-03-03T11:51:08+00:001 March 2022|Asteroid, News|

Second submission to GOSA project. This was marked as a “Hot target”. There was a close almost-grazing-occultation with the fainter star nearby. Looked like it was going to be very close but I suspect missed in the end.

Object ID22 Kalliope
Details2022-02-28 20:11:12 to 2022-02-28 23:58:17
Telescope250mm f4.8 Newtonian
V filter
CameraAtik 460EX @-10°C
Exposure(s)290 x 45s
darks, flats, bias
CaptureNINA
ProcessingGOSA

68 Leto asteroid light curve

2022-02-28T14:51:24+00:0028 February 2022|Asteroid, News|

First submission to GOSA project – Gaia-Groundbased Observational Service for Asteroids (Gaia-GOSA)

Object ID68 Leto
Details2022-02-26 22:01:29  to 2022-02-27 00:47:26
Telescope250mm f4.8 Newtonian
V filter
CameraAtik 460EX @-10°C
Exposure(s)147 x 60s
darks, flats, bias
CaptureNINA
ProcessingGOSA

(201) Penelope light curve

2022-02-22T12:30:07+00:0011 February 2022|Asteroid, News, Other|

A large main belt asteroid, discovered by Austrian astronomer Johann Palisa in 1879. Thought I’d try the same technique as for an eclipsing binary. One extra step in AstroImageJ to track the asteroid between frames. Didn’t get enough data to determine a period and comparison stars were impossible to find in this particular field so relative flux only.

Object ID(201) Penelope
Details2022-02-10
21:39:08 – 00:59:05 UT
Telescope250mm f4.8 Newtonian
CameraAtik 460EX @-10°C
V filter
Exposure(s)95 x 120s
darks, flats, bias
CaptureNINA
ProcessingAstroImageJ

Sun 2022-02-08

2022-02-08T11:33:35+00:008 February 2022|News, Sun|

Sun is getting high enough to see again. Very active at the moment.
Mono image, colourised as Duotone.

Object IDSun
Details2022-02-08 11:08 UT
Telescope250mm f4.8 Newtonian
CameraAtik 460EX
Black polymer filter, V filter
Exposure(s)0.01s
CaptureNINA
ProcessingPhotoshop

V1297 Cas eclipsing binary

2022-05-12T14:53:07+00:007 February 2022|Eclipsing Binary, News, Other, Variable Star|

No predictions for transit times for this one so trial and error. Sadly missed both peaks and dips.

Object IDV1297 Cas
Eclipsing binary in Cassiopeia
Details2022-02-06
19:34 – 23:27 UT
Telescope250mm f4.8 Newtonian
Photometric V filter
CameraAtik 460EX @-10°C
Exposure(s)620 x 15s
darks, flats, bias
CaptureNINA
ProcessingAstroImageJ
V1297 apertures

NR CAM eclipsing binary

2022-05-12T14:53:16+00:0028 January 2022|Eclipsing Binary, News, Other, Variable Star|

Got both secondary and primary transits before cloud came in but had hoped to get both peaks to see if asymmetric or not which might indicate star spots. Primary transit is deeper than the secondary.

Wrote a How-To article on the ASE website about this: How to record an eclipsing binary transit light curve

Object IDNR CAM
Eclipsing binary in Camelopardalis
Details2022-01-27
18:01 – 22:22 UT
Telescope250mm f4.8 Newtonian
Photometric V filter
CameraAtik 460EX @-10°C
Exposure(s)476 x 25s
darks, flats, bias
CaptureNINA
ProcessingAstroImageJ

Finder chart and data:
AAVSO — Variable Star Plotter

V523 Cas eclipsing binary

2022-05-12T14:53:30+00:0025 January 2022|Eclipsing Binary, News, Other, Variable Star|

Cloud stopped play so caught the primary transit but not the secondary. Will try this one again since it transits so fast.

Object IDV523 Cas
Eclipsing binary star
Details2022-01-24
21:44 – 22:58 UT
Telescope250mm f4.8 Newtonian
CameraAtik 460EX @-10°C
Photometric R filter
Exposure(s)137 x 25s
darks, flats, bias
CaptureNINA
ProcessingAstroImageJ

AAVSO — Variable Star Plotter