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M101 (NGC 4321)

2020-04-19T19:59:23+00:0017 April 2020|Galaxy, M91+, News|

Added twice as many frames as normal – still noisy. Probably need longer exposures. Bad gradients needed a lot of work in APP.

Object IDM101, NGC 4321
DetailsSpiral galaxy, Ursa Major
Mag. 9.5
Size 7.4’x6.3′
Telescope250mm f4.8 Newtonian
CameraAtik 460EX @-15C
Exposure(s)20x180s each RGB
darks, flats, bias
CaptureAPT
ProcessingAPP, Photoshop

M51 with synth G

2020-02-23T12:44:17+00:0023 February 2020|Galaxy, News|

Green channel was very noisy with horrible LP gradients in it so synthesised G from R + B. Still noisy though.

Object IDM51 Whirlpool Galaxy
DetailsRed channel 2020-02-15
Blue channel 2020-02-18
Telescope250mm f4.8 OO Newtonian
CameraAtik 460EX@15C
Baader RGB
Exposure(s)15x180s ea RB
darks, flats, bias
CaptureAPT
ProcessingSIRIL (first time)
Photoshop

Supernova SN 2020ue in NGC 4636

2020-01-19T20:57:00+00:0019 January 2020|Galaxy, News, Other|

Object IDSN 2020ue
NGC 4636
Details2020-01-19 01:12:57 UT
Muniwin gives mag. as 12.56
RA = 12 42 47
DEC = +2 39 35
FWHM = 2.77 pxl
Sky = 1708.31 ADU
Sky dev. = 50.19 ADU
Net intensity = 94384.6 ADU
Noise = 271.5 ADU
S/N ratio = -25.4 dB
Brightness = 12.5627 mag
Error = 0.0031 mag
Telescope250mm f4.8 OO Newtonian
CameraAtik 460EX @-15C
Exposure(s)5x120s 2×2 TR
CaptureAPT
ProcessingNebulosity, Muniwin

NGC4565 / Caldwell 38 Spindle Galaxy

2019-04-01T16:19:57+00:001 April 2019|Caldwell, Galaxy, News|

Processed 3 different ways – give different results, not sure which I like best. Still too noisy – need many more exposures.
Interesting edge-on spiral galaxy in Coma Berenices, surprisingly large (14.9′ x 2′) but faint (9.60 but surface brightness 13.3). It is actually intrinsically more luminous than the Andromeda Galaxy. First seen by William Herschel in 1785. Also visible lower right is NGC 4562.

Object IDNGC 4565, Caldwell 38 Spindle Galaxy
Details2019-03-31
Telescope203mm RC8 f8
CameraAtik 460Ex @-20C
Badder RGB filters
IDAS P2 LP filter
Exposure(s)10x240s 2×2 RGB
Darks
CaptureAPT
ProcessingNebulosity, Photoshop

M82 RGB

2019-02-12T16:41:19+00:0012 February 2019|Galaxy, M61-90, News|

Just a few frames before clouds so a bit grainy.

Object IDM82 Cigar galaxy
Ursa Major
Details2019-02-09
Telescope250mm f4.8 Newtonian
IDAS P2 filter
CameraAtik 460EX, Baader RGB
Exposure(s)4 x 180s each filter
darks
CaptureAPT
ProcessingNebulosity, Photoshop

M81 LRGB

2018-11-06T15:50:08+00:006 November 2018|Galaxy, M61-90, News|

Lots of gradients and stray light from somewhere coming in. Hard to process and as a result have lost the fainter outer arms.

Object IDM81 Bode’s galaxy
Mag. 6.94, Size 26.9′ x 14.1′
Ursa Major
Details2018-11-1 21:59 – 22:47 UT
Telescope250mm f4.8 Newtonian, MPCC
IDAS P2 LPR filter
Guided
CameraAtik 460EX, Baader LRGB  filters
Exposure(s)L 20x120s 1×1, RGB 10x60s 2×2 each
darks, flats were no good
CaptureAPT
ProcessingNebulosity 4, Photoshop

M31 first test of old 10 inch Newt

2018-11-06T15:51:38+00:0012 October 2018|Galaxy, M31-60, News|

First test of the old 10 inch Newtonian I picked up. Focuser and dovetail were a mess, but with some work it could be good. Optically pretty sound though.

Object IDM31 Andromeda galaxy
Mag. 3.44, Size 3.1 x 1 degrees
Andromeda
Details2018-10-11 22:26 – 23:49 UT
Telescope250mm f4.8 Newtonian, MPCC
IDAS P2 LPR filter
Guided
CameraAtik 460EX, Baader LRGB  filters
Exposure(s)L 16x120s 1×1, RGB 10x60s 2×2 each
darks
CaptureAPT
ProcessingNebulosity 4, Photoshop

NGC 3628

2017-03-28T09:11:07+00:0028 March 2017|Galaxy, News, NGC Spring|

Unbarred spiral galaxy, Leo
Mag 10.2 Size 15′ × 3′.6
2017-03-21
200mm f8 RC
Piggyback guiding with 70mm f/7 refractor
L 22×240s 2×2, RGB 11×120s 4×4 Darks Bias Flats
Atik 460EX (-24C), LRGB filters, IDAS P2 LPR filter
Captured in APT, Processed in Nebulosity3, PS CC, LightRoom

Poor transparency resulting in lots of light pollution and gradients. Also focusing and guiding was not the best.

NGC 3628, also known as the Hamburger Galaxy or Sarah’s Galaxy, is an unbarred spiral galaxy about 35 million light-years away in the constellation Leo. It was discovered by William Herschel in 1784. It has an approximately 300,000 light-years long tidal tail. Along with M65 and M66, NGC 3628 forms the Leo Triplet, a small group of galaxies. Its most conspicuous feature is the broad and obscuring band of dust located along the outer edge of its spiral arms, effectively transecting the galaxy to the view from Earth.

Due to the presence of an x-shaped bulge, visible in multiple wavelengths, it has been argued that NGC 3628 is instead a barred spiral galaxy with the bar seen end-on Simulations have shown that bars often form in disk galaxies during interactions and mergers, and NGC 3628 is known to be interacting with its two large neighbors.

M101 (NGC 5457) Pinwheel Galaxy

2017-03-27T13:03:00+00:0027 March 2017|Galaxy, M91+, News|

Galaxy, Ursa Major
Mag 7.86 Size 28?.8 × 26?.9
2017-03-25
200mm f8 RC
Piggyback guiding with 70mm f/7 refractor
L 20×240s 2×2, RGB 10×120s 4×4 Darks Bias Flats
Atik 460EX (-24C), LRGB filters, IDAS P2 LPR filter
Captured in APT, Processed in Nebulosity3, PS CC, LightRoom

Horrible gradients again. I suspect collimation and camera alignment need some work.

M101 is a large galaxy comparable in size to the Milky Way. With a diameter of 170,000 light-years it is roughly equal the size of the Milky Way. It has a disk mass on the order of 100 billion solar masses, along with a small central bulge of about 3 billion solar masses.

M101 is noted for its high population of H II regions, many of which are very large and bright. H II regions usually accompany the enormous clouds of high density molecular hydrogen gas contracting under their own gravitational force where stars form. H II regions are ionized by large numbers of extremely bright and hot young stars; those in M101 are capable of creating hot superbubbles. In a 1990 study, 1264 H II regions were cataloged in the galaxy. Three are prominent enough to receive New General Catalogue numbers – NGC 5461, NGC 5462, and NGC 5471.

M101 is asymmetrical due to the tidal forces from interactions with its companion galaxies. These gravitational interactions compress interstellar hydrogen gas, which then triggers strong star formation activity in M101’s spiral arms that can be detected in ultraviolet images.

In 2001, the x-ray source P98, located in M101, was identified as an ultra-luminous X-ray source – a source more powerful than any single star but less powerful than a whole galaxy – using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. It received the designation M101 ULX-1. In 2005, Hubble and XMM-Newton observations showed the presence of an optical counterpart, strongly indicating that M101 ULX-1 is an x-ray binary. Further observations showed that the system deviated from expected models – the black hole is just 20 to 30 solar masses, and consumes material (including captured stellar wind) at a higher rate than theory suggests.

M51 (NGC 5194)

2017-02-17T22:26:53+00:0017 February 2017|Galaxy, M31-60, News|

“Whirlpool”, Spiral Galaxy, Canes Venatici
Mag 8.4 Size 11.2′ x 6.9′
2017-02-16
200mm f8 RC
Piggyback guiding with 70mm f/7 refractor
L 10×240s 2×2, RGB 10×120s 4×4 Darks Bias Flats
Atik 460EX (-25C), LRGB filters, IDAS P2 LPR filter
Captured in APT, Processed in Nebulosity3, PS CC, LightRoom

Best clear night for a while. Quite transparent and still.

M81 (NGC 3031)

2017-01-30T14:12:41+00:0022 January 2017|Galaxy, M61-90, News|

Spiral Galaxy, Ursa Major
Mag 6.9, size 21’x10′
2017-01-02
200mm f8 RC at f6 (Revelation x0.75 reducer)
Piggyback guiding with 70mm f/7 refractor
L 10×240s 2×2, RGB 10×120s 4×4 Darks Bias Flats
Atik 460EX (-25C), LRGB filters, IDAS P2 LPR filter
Captured in APT, Processed in Nebulosity3, PS CC, LightRoom

Terrible trouble with LP, noise and flats. Hard to process out the flaws.

Messier 81 (also known as NGC 3031 or Bode’s Galaxy) is a spiral galaxy about 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. Due to its proximity to Earth, large size and active galactic nucleus (which harbors a 70 million M☉ supermassive black hole), Messier 81 has been studied extensively by professional astronomers. The galaxy’s large size and relatively high brightness also make it a popular target for amateur astronomers.

Messier 81 was first discovered by Johann Elert Bode on December 31, 1774. Consequently, the galaxy is sometimes referred to as “Bode’s Galaxy”. In 1779, Pierre Méchain and Charles Messier reidentified Bode’s object, which was subsequently listed in the Messier Catalogue.

Wikipedia

M31 core

2016-10-03T13:24:12+00:003 October 2016|Galaxy, M31-60, News|

Haven’t visited this one for ages. FOV obviously too small to fit the whole galaxy in.
Had to stop after 6 exposures because sky transparency was reducing and dew was becoming an issue.
Dust lanes show up nicely.

2016-10-02
200mm f5 Newtonian, piggyback guiding C80ED
L 6×90 1×1, RGB 6×60 2×2
BPM, flats
Atik 460EX (-21C), LRGB filters, IDAS P2 LPR filter
Captured in APT, Processed in Nebulosity3, PS CC, LightRoom

M31 (NGC 224)

2016-11-01T10:32:50+00:0031 August 2009|Galaxy, M31-60|

Includes M32 (lower right) and M110 (top)
Spiral Galaxy, Andromeda – THE Andromeda Galaxy
Mag 3.4 Size 178’x63′
2009-08-17
C80ED f7.5, Canon EOS 350D, DS Filter, Guided
5x120s 5x180s subs
Reprocessed 1/11/2016
Stacked in Nebulosity 3, Processed in PS CC
Well it’s my first attempt. Still need more photons.

M33 (NGC 598)

2017-01-31T10:52:42+00:009 October 2015|Galaxy, M31-60, News|

Spiral Galaxy, Traingulum
Mag 7 Size 73’x45′
2015-10-08
200mm f8 RC, piggyback guiding C80ED
L 8×300 2×2, RGB 8×240 3×3
BPM, flats
Atik 460EX (-10C), LRGB filters, IDAS P2 LPR filter
Captured in APT, Processed in Nebulosity3, PS CC, LightRoom

Updated 2015-10-09 using the 460EX. Older one below.
Low surface brightness. Hard to image effectively.

M33

2012-09-18
200mm f8 RC, OAG
15x240s, 2x360x ISO 1600, darks, flats
Canon EOS 350D modded, Astronomik CLS
Captured in APT, Processed in Nebulosity, PS CS5